Wolftrap

Living in southeast Virginia, we are accustomed to VERY old homes. Of course, Bacon’s Castle is the oldest, dating from 1665. But there are many houses, dating from the 1700’s and 1800’s, in our area. Some have been maintained all through the years, some have been carefully restored after falling into disrepair, and others remain in poor condition.

Wolftrap, named for a nearby creek, was located on a country road not far from us and was on the National Register of Historic Places. Motor Man’s sister, Carolyn, is friends with the owner of Wolftrap, thought to be built around 1846, although Carolyn feels that it dates to an earlier period.

A few months ago,  we were invited to have a look.

This was the back of Wolftrap, but I think it was beautiful enough to have been the front.

And this is a picture from many years ago. I’m not sure of the date. Carolyn gave me permission to use this photo.

This was the front of the house, as seen from the lane.

Whenever I’m in an old house, I always try to imagine living there years ago. It’s hard to think about climbing these narrow stairs to the second floor every day. Especially for women with the longer dresses they wore in those days.

Or how about these steps to the third floor?

I love paths and lanes almost as much as sunrises and sunsets, so I took this picture of the lane from one of the second story windows.

And this one from a front dormer – up one floor from the previous picture.

Imagine the stories this old house could have told.

Since these photos were taken, Wolftrap has been completely dismantled. It is for sale, to be rebuilt at another location.

Carolyn sent me this photo of the site with the old home almost gone.

So, if you know of anyone interested in a big project….

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23 responses to “Wolftrap

  1. WOW…..all those dormers….and narrow stairs – but the house certainly “had its day” from that old shot…..quite a grand place. I love old houses too – no doubt those spirits who inhabited it until its’ dismantling will finally move on now that the house is “at rest” ! Great photos.

    Pam (and Sam)

  2. Oh, I sincerely hope someone buys this old home and restores it to its former glory. It’s a shame we have lost so many old homes that were left to just deteriorate.

  3. Very interesting Dianna and what a beautiful cool old house. I love the name. I love the stairs and the dormers AND the four? fireplaces! The sunny lane picture looks as though it has a frame around it. I hope someone purchases it and give it new life.

  4. Beautiful old home! Love the four chimneys and all the dormers, especially the ones on the back. I also noticed from the older pic that that it had a porch upstairs too. It’s wonderful to get a glimpse of how it looked years ago. There is so much history in that part of Virginia. I too hope it finds new life in a new location. Thanks for sharing:)

  5. Ella Fitzgerald singing ♪”Oh I need someone to watch over me”♫ comes to mind when I look at this photostory. Lovely old house. Thank you for the views. I do hope someone “will bring out the key” to watch over this house.

  6. I really enjoyed seeing those pictures, Dianna. I do the same thing and try to envision what it was like growing up there, living there, experiencing so much there… Time marches on, doesn’t it?

  7. I never saw that one – sorry it has been dismantled, but hopefully someone will take it on. I would have been afraid to walk up those stairs…just think of all the critters living there!

  8. that would be QUITE a project! love all those dormers, though.

  9. I’m with you…old, historic homes {historic anything really!}…paths…the sky! Such a beautiful place this is…any idea why it would be restored somewhere else??

  10. I’d have to say this is one of my favorite posts recently. The two dormer pics are perfect, and this window layout is (I think) unique to Wolftrap. You just don’t see double ranks of dormers .. And I’ve never seen a pic of it from it’s “lived-in” days .
    I can’t imagine trying to put it all back together … !

  11. itsallaboutpurple

    what a wonderful series, i love these old places, the architecture and history are amazing. you captured it beautifully, i really enjoyed this entry!!

  12. Oh to have the funds, time and resources to rebuild such a beautiful piece of history!

  13. Oh, too bad it couldn’t be rebuilt and stay in the original place. And ~ “if these walls could talk…” Very interesting post.

  14. I’ve always wanted to restore an old home like this, but it is often difficult to do. Old houses just have so much character and individuality. But the cost of renovating one can be astronomical. I hope someone comes along who can take care of this.

  15. I hope someone buys the home and can restore it in grand old fashion. Your photos are great. I’m like you, I’ve always wondered about how the women got around in those hoop skirts and corsets. :)

  16. That windy stairway reminds me of one in the house of a neighbor who used to keep me when my mom needed a babysitter. That would be quite a job to rebuild! Sad to see removed from its home.

  17. Very interesting and beautiful old home. I hope someone buys it and restores it to its former glory.

  18. Beautiful photographs, perhaps somebody will renovate these houses. I am greeting

  19. How fascinating! I’ve never heard of dismantling a home. Around here, they might move the whole structure down the street to a new owner’s lot, but never take it down to rebuild it somewhere else. Thanks for the post, Dianna. Have a really great day!

  20. I’m with you, I love to imagine who lived there once and what their hopes & dreams were. I hope the home is able to be rebuilt and restored to shine once again. MJ

  21. Shirley Matthews Dunn

    Another old wonderful place that I did not know was in Isle Wright. Thanks for the history.

  22. Oh my goodness, aren’t those stairs something?? Fascinating look inside that old house. Hope someone rebuilds and restores such a charming old home.

  23. Pingback: Random Five Friday | these days of mine

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