Monthly Archives: November 2019

Raymond, Wild Horses, And One Poor Sunfish

Last weekend, Motor Man and I attended the Corolla Wild Horse Fund Open House at their rescue facility.

The organization hosts these events once or twice each year. They’re wonderful opportunities for their fans and supporters to meet the staff and volunteers AND see some of the horses who now call the rescue farm home.

This time the focus was on Raymond, the mule.  You may recall my recent post in which I shared that Raymond was removed from the beach because of concerns for his health.

Raymond presented some challenges to the CWHF staff members once he arrived at the farm. They realized right away that he needed a “Raymond-proof” enclosure, which they set about building immediately.

They are pleased to report that Raymond is now all settled in and adapting well to the domestic life.

During the time we were there, he completely ignored his adoring public and munched happily on a pile of hay.

Wagon rides were offered, so you know Motor Man and I bought a ticket. The horse was a Percheron named Angel.

 

Earlier in the week, I shared this picture of us in that cute wagon.

In the past, I’ve written about Amadeo, the wild Corolla/Carova stallion that was  blinded years ago during a fight with another stallion. One night, bystanders saw him wandering into the ocean. Thankfully, he was able to get footing on a sandbar, and was rescued by heroes from Ocean Rescue.  Amadeo is now living the good life at the farm and is quite the sweet, old gentleman.

After visiting the horses at the farm, we drove on to Carova to see their cousins still living in the wild. I took this with my zoom lens, and was tickled when she looked my way, right on cue.

For sale?  Yes, I’ll take it. (Just kiddin’, Motor Man.)

During a recent coastal storm, some disturbing “debris” washed up on shore. I’d seen a picture, posted by a Facebook friend who lives in Carova, of this dead sunfish. But it was amazing to see the size of it in person.

From Wikipedia, I learned that adult sunfish weigh between about 550 and 2200 pounds.

I was windblown and wearing no lipstick, but in much better shape than this poor fish

No indeed, I was not touching it, but look at the size of its face compared to my hand. (Something about its mouth looks almost human to me…..ick.)

From the beauty of the wild horses (AND Raymond), to the not-so-pretty of a dead fish washed up on the beach, our trip was definitely not boring.

~These Days Of Mine~

 

 

 

 

Poetic Thursday: It’s A Dog’s Life

First of all, Happy Thanksgiving. May we all be aware of something to be thankful for today.

And, it’s also Poetic Thursday, hosted by Pam, Teddy and Angel Sammy over at Two Spoiled Cats.

  Here’s the inspirational photo they provided for us this week.

And here’s my poem:

It’s A Dog’s Life

When I saw this picture, no poem came to mind.
I couldn’t come up with a single line.

So I asked hubby about it when he got home,
and the two of us came up with a poem:

“You know what they say:
every dog has its day.”

The End.

~These Days Of Mine~

 

Thankful

Squeezed in between Halloween and the full-out Christmas season is  Thanksgiving.

There are several memes right now on Facebook relating to being thankful. Some remind us to pay a kindness forward, others challenge us to post that for which we’re thankful, still others give us a different task to perform daily to help us remember to be grateful.

And they’re all good reminders.

Growing up in church taught me to be thankful with every prayer I pray. I know I fall short of thanking the Lord for all the many blessings He provides for me.

But I do try.

One of the things I’m most thankful for every day is my family.

On this Thanksgiving eve, I thought I’d invite you, my readers, to comment on this post and share one blessing (or more) that you’re thankful for in your life.

~These Days Of Mine~

E-43

Motor Man and I first met Jim back in the late 1990’s, when a mutual friend introduced us. Jim had been racing hydroplane (race boats) for many years, but had never won a race.  He asked Motor Man to start building his engines.

Motor Man and I began traveling to boat races from southeast Virginia to Maryland to Decatur, Illinois to New Jersey. Jim won many, many races and several championships in his 5-litre boat, E-43, which he named Keen’s Machine. There were a few tense post-race inspections , but no DQ’s (disqualifications). Motor Man does like living on the edge….

And during those years, Jim became more than a customer; he became a friend.  He sat with us at many local short-track (car) races, he came to our shop to work on his engine and/or boat and was there for Open House events we hosted.  He attended PRI (Performance Racing Industry) trade shows with us in Orlando and Indy.

Jim was at our wedding reception in 2002, and following the deaths in recent years of Motor Man’s parents, he visited to pay his respects.

Two weeks ago, Jim suffered a massive stroke and never regained consciousness.

He passed away Saturday morning.

We’re still processing the fact that he’s gone.

And, meanwhile, we’re going through old photos.

At Motor Man’s and my wedding reception. Jim’s crew chief, Joe, on the left, and Jim on the right.

Joe,  Motor Man and me, Jim and his brother, Doug, following a boat race Jim won in Portsmouth, Va.

Jim and Joe at an Open House at our shop. This was 2004, and Jim won a  championship that year.

Relaxing at our shop with a fellow race boat owner.

Dearborn, Michigan for the awards banquet in 2011.

And perhaps my favorite picture of Jim, taken in 2010. He won the high points title  that year.

In our office are several reminders of Jim’s accomplishments in boat racing. He graciously allowed us to display the checkered flag he received for his 2004 World Championship, won in Cambridge, Maryland. (Same flag that’s in the Open House photo above.)

And in 2008, Motor Man had a clock made for Jim to commemorate one of his championships. (We also had one made for us.)

Thanks for all the memories, Jim. We’ll most likely attend more boat races in the future, but they won’t be quite the same.

~These Days Of Mine~

 

 

 

 

Montgolfier Day

Yesterday morning, Motor Man received a call from Mark, our friend who owns the hot air balloon. Mark said that he had a flight scheduled for the afternoon. So we changed some plans (thanks, Marshall, for your flexibility) and joined Mark, his crew and his passengers for the launch.

And Mark gave us a brief history lesson.  Yesterday was Montgolfier Day.  (I’m guessing you didn’t celebrate…??)

It was the anniversary of the first hot air balloon flight carrying humans. This from Wikipedia:

On 21 November 1783, the first free flight by humans was made by Pilâtre de Rozier, together with an army officer, the marquis d’Arlandes.[10] The flight began from the grounds of the Château de la Muette close to the Bois de Boulogne park in the western outskirts of Paris. They flew about 3,000 feet (910 m) above Paris for a distance of nine kilometers. 

Wondering about the Montgolfier reference? This is from the web site Hot Air Ballooning News:

In 1782, the Montgolfier brothers discovered that smoke from a combustible material burned under a lightweight paper or cloth bag would make the bag rise into the air.  We know now that it is in fact the hot air that makes the bag rise but their mistake did not interfere with their research and inventions of the balloons.

The first ‘passengers’ to fly on 19th September 1783 were a sheep, duck and a rooster!

So what better way to celebrate November 21 than with a balloon flight? The passengers had no clue about the importance of the date to the ballooning world when they scheduled their flight for yesterday.

One of my favorite parts of the launch is when the burners are lit to fill the envelope with hot air.

Mark’s passengers were four friends, celebrating a couple of recent birthdays.

They were treated to a little colorful foliage during their flight.

 

The launch took place in late afternoon, which meant we were able to enjoy a pre-sunset sky.

A beautiful flight with a smooth landing: and that’s how you celebrate Montgolfier Day.

~These Days Of Mine~

Poetic Thursday: Fabulous Fifties

Once again, it’s Thursday, so that means it’s poetry day with Pam and her boys at Two Spoiled Cats.

The photo Pam provided for this week’s inspiration was especially fun.

Although I didn’t grow up in the 1950’s, my two older sisters did.  So I enjoyed writing this poem:

Fabulous Fifties

Ponytails and bobby socks
poodle skirts, rockin’ round the clock.

Elvis’s swivel, Chubby Checker’s twist,
our favorite songs on the Hit Parade list.

“Bad” boys with heel taps were so very cool,
and we rushed home to see Bandstand after school.

The music then was the best we’ve heard,
and we still remember every word.

Those black and white snapshots are silent reminders
of a simpler time when the world was kinder.

Memories take us back, that’s the only way;
the question is: if you could….would you stay?

My sisters, June and Rose, with me in the 1950’s

Thanks, Pam, for hosting this fun meme every week.

~These Days Of Mine~

Wild “Woody “Wednesday

Although our bird feeders have been filled with seed, I’ve seen very few birds recently.

Yesterday morning, as I passed by the kitchen window, I saw something I don’t recall ever seeing before.

When I went for my camera, he was gone, but soon returned.

I love his tiny claws hanging on to the edge. It’s nice to see that he’s sharing the feeder with a little friend.

I just always thought woodpeckers got their nourishment from boring into tree trunks. Interestingly, I assumed this to be a red-headed woodpecker, but upon research, learned that it’s a red-bellied woodpecker.

You’re welcome any time, my handsome feathered friend.

And thanks again to my longtime HUMAN friend, Shirley, for the gift of the beautiful bird feeder. The birds are certainly enjoying it.

~These Days Of Mine~