That Little Blue Plate

 
Since probably before I was born, this “little blue plate” hung by the front door of our house.

After I was grown, my Mom gave it to me. She said that it was on a bedroom mantle at Bacon’s Castle when she and her family moved into the house in the early 1920’s. She and her sisters shared the bedroom, and my mom “claimed” the plate.

Some time after she gave it to me (maybe a few months or even a couple of years later), this was a conversation we had one day while Mom was visiting:

Mom:  “I gave you that little blue plate, but I haven’t seen it since then.”

Me: “It’s in the china cabinet. I was afraid to hang it on the wall, because I don’t want to take a chance on it getting broken.”

Mom: “Well, I had it hanging on the wall all those years, and nothing ever happened to it.”

 I then went to the china cabinet, took out the plate and brought it to the sofa where Mom was sitting.  The string attached to the back of the plate was just a simple little piece of cotton twine. “We” decided to perform a little test.

I tugged gently on that string.  And it broke. So the plate went back into the china cabinet, where it’s been ever since.

When Mom gave this to me, I wasn’t familiar with Wedgewood. Even after realizing what it was, I was unable to find any information about this particular design.  A few years ago, a local museum offered an appraisal event by Sotheby’s. I took the little blue plate, and it was appraised for $750.

The plate may be worth that figure. But there’s no way I could put a price on the memories that it brings.

 

18 responses to “That Little Blue Plate

  1. No, you certainly can’t put a price on the memory it brings…Especially the memory of the string test! Great story and very pretty plate.

  2. How precious – the story! – and the plate because of its sentimental value! I have my great-grandmother’s white linen tablecloth – it has a couple of worn places that you can see through! But I treasure it!

  3. Lovely story. The plate is beautiful. It’s nice to know the retail value but I wouldn’t part with it either.

  4. I love Wedgewood – I have a collection of twelve plates that used to sit on a ledge around the top of my grandparent’s dining room – they are all I asked for from my grandma cause of the memories they held!

  5. oh absolutely not! priceless!

  6. It’s so pretty and you’re so lucky to have something that means so much to your mom!

  7. It’s beautiful but the best part is the story behind it! Definitely never sell 🙂

  8. A beautiful plate along with a great story. Thanks for sharing!

  9. It really is a beautiful plate! I love the story too!

  10. And that little blue plate was hanging on the wall before I was born. As well as a couple more items I remember fondly.

  11. Absolutely it stays in the family.

  12. Oh the memories we have and this one is special. Show it proudly!

  13. I LOVE that plate – such detail – I can see where it’s worth that much, but you’re absolutely right – you cannot put a price tag on something that has memories. Hope you keep it in your family for generations to come!

  14. Wedgwood is so elegant and enchanting. It’s such a precious memory treasure that you have. 🙂

  15. Yes, a great story … And I remember the tale of the “string test.” I suppose that little twine did a pretty good job over the years, but the best and safest place for it is in the china cabinet …. that your Dad made … ! 🙂

  16. So true! because it meant so much to your mother too.

  17. That’s a lovely pattern on the plate, a lot of detail. Definitely a keeper.

  18. Shirley Matthews Dunn

    What a family treasure to have. I love the story.

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